Fruits and Vegetables Safe for Dogs

It can be hard to say "no" when your dog shows those big, puppy dog eyes, hoping to receive some food off your plate in return. And, with most of these fruits and vegetables, you don't have to worry, as they are safe and even beneficial for your pet. Know what fruits and veggies are safe, and how you can prepare and serve them for the best nutritional punch for your pooch.

That being said, moderation is always key! To ensure your dog is getting all of the whole foods, even fruits and vegetables, should be considered a treat or supplement and should not exceed 10% of your dog's current diet. You may find that these yummy fruits and veggies are already included in your pet's diet, but real, whole food treats deliver more nutrition and flavour than their processed counterparts. 

We've ranked each of the foods as far as the maximum number of times we recommend feeding each food to your dog using the scale below. This scale is very moderate, you may find your dog can tolerate more (or less, as every dog is different). Let it serve as a rough guide. 

Feeding Tips:

  • While most of these vegetables can be chopped into bite-sized pieces and fed raw, they are easier for dogs to digest when they're lightly steamed, roasted, boiled, dehydrated (without added salt) or puréed. This allows dogs' bodies to absorb the maximum amount of nutrients possible without sacrificing the delicious flavour. 
  • Fruits and vegetables should be thoroughly washed before they are served to your dog.  
  • As a general rule, it's best to avoid canned vegetables because they can be filled with high amounts of salt. However, many canned vegetables can now be found in low sodium or no salt added varieties. 
  • Frozen fruits and veggies have added crunch and can be an easy way to give your pet vegetables year-round, without sacrificing a significant amount of nutrients.
  • Most pits and seeds contain chemicals that are toxic to dogs, so it is best to avoid feeding these portions of the fruit.
  • Choose fruits without added sugars.


Feeding Frequency Scale:

One Rarely to Never (once every couple of months) 
Two Once in a while (1 - 2 times per month) 
Three Occasionally (1 time per week) 
Four Fairly Often (2 - 3 times per week)
Five Daily (safe in recommended portions)


Please note:

As often as possible, it is important to avoid feeding your dog ingredients such as artificial preservatives, colours, and flavours, as well as excess salt and sugar, which can be harmful to dogs. This list refers to human-grade, whole foods, not processed varieties (although some lightly processed varieties are mentioned). 

The Portion Sizes listed after each food below are recommendations based on dogs that have a moderate energy level. Please take your dog's size, energy level, and specific dietary requirements and restrictions into consideration when deciding whether to feed certain human foods. Also keep in mind that some dogs are more fussy than others and may not enjoy the same foods that you do, even if they are healthy for them.

Apples

Apple

Can dogs eat apple? The answer is yes! Apples make great dog treats for a number of reasons. Apples are very fibrous and provide vitamins A and C, as well as potassium and flavonoids. Many dogs like the crunchy texture, which actually can help clean residue from their teeth and freshen breath (an added bonus for you). Like many fruits, apples are high in water content, which helps to keep pets full and hydrated. Apples also contain pectin, which is a naturally occurring sugar that works as a digestive aid. Do not feed your dog apple cores or seeds, which may contain cyanide - a chemical that is harmful to dogs.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 small slice cut into bite-sized pieces, 1-2 tablespoons natural, unsweetened applesauce
  • 30lbs dog - 1/2 of an average-size apple cut into bite-sized pieces, up to 1/4 cup natural, unsweetened applesauce
  • 70lbs dog - 1 average-size apple cut into bite-sized pieces, up to 3/4 cup natural, unsweetened applesauce
Feeding Tips:
  • Slice the apple into bite-sized pieces before feeding to your dog
  • Add a small amount of peanut butter to apple slices to make them even more appetizing
  • Remove core and all seeds
  • The peel may be left on or removed for easier digestion
  • Add a small amount of natural, unsweetened applesauce to your dog's dish

Apricots

Apricot

Apricots are a good source of potassium, beta-carotene, and fibre. Fresh apricots have a high moisture content. Make sure to remove the seeds and pit before feeding them to your dog because they contain cyanide, a chemical harmful to dogs.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Two
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1/2 - 1 small apricot, cut into bite sized pieces
  • 30 lbs dog - 1 - 2 small apricots, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 70lbs dog - 3 -4 small apricots, cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Cut into bite-sized pieces before serving
  • Do not feed whole apricot to your dog
  • Dried apricots can make a tasty snack, but do not provide water and therefore, can be sugar and calorie dense and should be limited.

Asparagus

Asparagus

Asparagus is a great source of dietary fibre for dogs to keep their digestive system functioning properly. As well, it is rich in a variety of vitamins (A, E, C, B1, B2, and K) and minerals (iron, copper, manganese, folate, and potassium). Just as with humans, asparagus can alter the smell of your dog's urine. 

Feeding Frequency Scale Three
 Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 - 2 bite-sized pieces
  • 30lbs dog - 3-4 bite-sized pieces (1 stalk)
  • 70lbs dog - up to 2 stalks, cut into bite-sized pieces
 Feeding Tips:
  • Steam before feeding to boost digestibility
  • Be sure to cut asparagus into bite-sized pieces as its stringy stalk can be a choking hazard

Bananas

Banana

Bananas are great for active and working dogs because of their reserves of electrolytes, natural sugars and carbohydrates, and potassium, which boost energy by balancing internal fluids and help maintain muscle strength. They also provide dietary fibre as well as essential amino acids and other beneficial nutrients. Bananas can be a natural remedy for dog diarrhea, just feed half a banana to firm up stools. Since banana has a high soluble fibre content, start with half the recommended dosage first to see how your dog responds. Some dogs may become constipated if fed too much banana.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 small slice (1" total) of a banana 
  • 30lbs dog - up to 1/4 banana (2-3")
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 banana (4-5")
Feeding Tips:
  • Cut or break into bite-sized pieces
  • Mash/puree and mix a small portion into your dog's regular food
  • Bring a banana to share with your dog on a long hike or during a high agility training class. 

Beets

Beets

Beets cleanse and improve the functioning of your dog's liver. They provide beta-carotene, iron, magnesium, potassium, and vitamins A, B, and C. Beets are also high in fibre.

Feeding Frequency Scale Three
 Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 1/4 beets, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 30lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup fresh or cooked beets, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 70lbs dog - up to 3/4 cup beets, cut into bite-sized pieces
 Feeding Tips:
  • Serve raw or fully cooked
  • Feed in bite-sized portions (try frozen) to minimize the mess - beet juice can stain easily (including your dog's fur)! 

Bell Peppers

Bell Peppers

Your dog just may love chomping on bell peppers like you do. All colours are okay for dogs to eat and are a great source of fibre and are very high in Vitamin C and other vitamins (B, K, A, and E). Bell peppers are mild in flavour compared to other peppers and are known to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties for dogs. They're also high in essential minerals and carotenoids, such as phosphorous, magnesium, manganese, beta-carotene, and folate.

Feeding Frequency Scale Four
 Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1-2 thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving
  • 30lbs dog - 2 -3 thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup thinly sliced pieces, raw or cooked; remove seeds before serving
 Feeding Tips:
  • Serve raw or fully cooked, all colours 

Blackberries

Blackberries

Like many other berries, blackberries are high in antioxidants, fibre, and a variety of vitamins and minerals. Antioxidants are important because they can fight the free radicals that cause cancer to develop. Blackberries do contain quite a bit of natural sugars, so make sure you don't feed your dog too many at once.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size: 2 - 3 large berries
Feeding Tips:
  • Feed to your dog fresh or frozen

Blueberries

Blueberries

Blueberries are considered to be a superfood for both humans and dogs. They contain high levels of antioxidants, vitamins C and E, as well as selenium, zinc, and beneficial phytochemicals. Like other berries, though, they are rich in natural sugars and should not be fed in excess.     

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 1 Tbsp. blueberries (5 berries)
  • 30lbs dog - 2-3 Tbsp. blueberries (10-15 berries)
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup blueberries (20-30 berries)
Feeding Tips:
  • Feed to your dog fresh or frozen
  • Lightly mash and mix into your dog's regular food

Broccoli

Broccoli

Raw broccoli can be particularly difficult for dogs to digest, but steaming, cooking, or puréeing broccoli can make digesting it a little easier. Vitamins A, C, and K are all found in broccoli, as well as minerals like folate and manganese. It may also have some anti-inflammatory and immune-boosting properties. Broccoli is full of fibre and is a member of the brassica family, so feeding too much of it to your dog can cause GI irritation and bad gas.

Feeding Frequency Scale Three
 Adequate Portion Size:
  •  10lbs dog - up to 1 small floret, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  30lbs dog - 1 - 2 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  70lbs dog - 3 - 4 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces
 Feeding Tips:
  • Cook or steam
  • Cut into small florets before feeding
  • Stems are also safe to feed to dogs in small portions 

Carrots

Carrots

Raw carrots make a nice crunchy, fibrous treat that can help clean your dog's teeth and give him a boost of energy. Their low calorie and low fat content does not affect nutrient quality, however. Carrots are packed with a variety of nutrients like Vitamin A and beta-carotene, which are good for your dog's eye health, immune system, and skin and coat. These superfoods are also high in natural sugars, so it is best to feed them in moderation.

Feeding Frequency Scale Three
Adequate Portion Size
  •  10lbs dog - 2-3 bite-sized pieces (1Tbsp)
  •  30lbs dog - 3-4 bite-sized pieces (up to 1/4 cup)
  •  70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips
  • Feed raw or steamed baby carrots
  • Cut larger carrots into bite-sized pieces
  • Cooked carrots are more easily-digestible to dogs  

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a great source of Vitamin C as well as Vitamins B6 and K, folate, and choline. Another member of the brassica family, cauliflower, like broccoli, can be a little more difficult for your canine to digest, so be sure to just feed small pieces on rare occasions. 

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 1 small floret, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 30lbs dog - 1 - 2 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 70lbs dog - 3 - 4 small florets, cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Best served steamed or cooked to make it more digestible
  • Cut into bite-sized pieces before serving 

Celery

Celery

The idea of plain, raw celery may not seem very appealing, but it can offer some great health benefits for dogs that take an interest in munching on it. Celery is a good source of Vitamin C to boost your dog's immune system and minerals such as calcium, potassium, iron, and phosphorous. Celery is great for your dog's cardiovascular health, reduces inflammation, and freshens your dog's breath. It also has a great crunch and is moisture-rich - a perfect summer snack!

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 2 - 3 1/2" wide pieces, raw, cooked, or pureed
  • 30lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-sized pieces
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Cut into bite-sized pieces and add a little peanut butter to grab dog's attention
  • Serve cooked, steamed, or pureed without seasoning
  • Cut in small pieces as stringy pieces can be a choking hazard

Citrus fruits - Lemons, Limes, Oranges

Lime, Lemon, and Orange

Many dogs do not enjoy the bitter flavour of citrus fruits, which are very acidic and can lead to pH imbalances in dogs' bodies if too much is consumed. Lemons, limes, and oranges can have health benefits in very small portions, though. The fruit flesh itself is rich in vitamins A, C, B1, and B6, potassium, folic acid, flavonoids, and phytonutrients. Don't feed your dog the rind, seeds, or leaves, however; these are all harmful to dogs. Grapefruit is toxic to dogs and should be avoided.

Feeding Frequency Scale: One
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10 lbs dog - 1/2 section or segment on a minimal, infrequent basis
  • 30 lbs dog - One section or segment on a minimal, infrequent basis
  • 70lbs dog - 1 - 2 segments on a minimal, infrequent basis
Feeding Tips:
  • Make sure to remove all rind, seeds, and leaves
  • Cut flesh of fruit into bite-sized pieces before feeding 

Coconut/Coconut Oil

Coconut

Coconut and coconut oil are high in beneficial fats (lauric acid), which is a natural antiviral and antibacterial. It will help boost your pup's immune system function and protect against various infections and ailments. The most common form to feed dogs is coconut oil, which can also be applied topically to hot spots, infected cuts, or cracked paws. Additionally, a small amount of coconut oil can help soothe your dog's upset stomach and ease digestion.

Avoid canned coconut milk, which can be high in unnecessary fats & preservatives. When using the oil form, use "virgin coconut oil", which is suitable for both dogs and humans. Fresh coconut flesh and the juice inside can be fed as well, but it is best to keep the husk away from your dog to prevent him from choking.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Five (coconut oil form)
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 tsp coconut oil or coconut water 1/2" square piece of coconut flesh with husk removed
  • 30lbs dog - Up to 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or coconut water, 1" square piece of coconut flesh with husk removed
  • 70lbs dog - Up to 2 Tbsp coconut oil or coconut water (1 Tbsp per 30lbs body weight, or 1 tsp per 10lbs), up to 3 1" square pieces of coconut flesh with husk removed
Feeding Tips:
  • Mix small amount of coconut oil directly into dog's food
  • Apply coconut oil directly to affected areas (i.e. paws)

Corn

Corn

Whole grain corn is safe for most dogs to eat. However, corn can be difficult to digest, which also means it offers dogs little nutritional value aside from fibre content. Fresh corn (cooked or raw) is still a lot better than corn as a dog food ingredient. While corn in dog food has been linked to allergies, these are unlikely to be a problem if you're feeding the whole food, as these allergies likely come from mites, molds, and other organisms that are included in the processing of corn ingredients - not the corn itself.

What about popcorn, you may ask? It's okay to toss your dog a piece of air-popped popcorn here and there while you're watching a movie as long as it is free of salt, butter, and other seasonings.

Feeding Frequency Scale: One-Half
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 1Tbsp corn kernels
  • 30lbs dog - 1 - 2 Tbsp. steamed, raw, or frozen corn kernels; one small handful air-popped popcorn without butter, salt or other seasonings (remove kernels if possible)
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup corn kernels
Feeding Tips:
  • Can be fed raw, steamed, or even frozen
  • Cut off the cob (corn cobs are a common choking hazard)
  • Feed plain, air-popped popcorn in very small portions

Cranberries

Cranberries

Cranberries can provide the same benefit for pets as they do for humans. They promote proper urinary tract function and can also both prevent and relieve symptoms associated with urinary tract infections in dogs. Cranberries are also a good source of fibre, vitamins A, B1, B2, and C, antioxidants, and minerals. Your dog may prefer the berries without the skin, which can be bitter. While cranberries can help an existing UTI, they should not be used as a substitute for medical care. If you suspect your pet has a UTI, see a vet immediately.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 2 - 3 mashed or frozen berries
  • 30lbs dog - 4 - 5 mashed or frozen berries
  • 70lbs dog - up to 2 Tbsp mashed or frozen (about 10 berries)
Feeding Tips:
  • Remove skin to increase palatability
  • Feed fresh or frozen
  • Mash and mix into your dog's regular food if he will not eat them on their own

Cucumber

Cucumbers

Cucumber can make a refreshing and filling snack for both you and your dog. It is a good source of Vitamins A, B, C, D and K as well as potassium and silica. In addition, it is low in carbohydrates and includes anti-inflammatory properties to help dogs with arthritis and many other conditions. Phytochemicals found in this vegetable kill off the bacteria in your dog's mouth that cause bad breath.

Due to cucumber's high water content, feeding too much can cause your dog's stools to be loose. Stay away from pickled foods due to their excess vinegar and salt content.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 - 2 bite-sized pieces, peeled
  • 30lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-sized pieces, peeled
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized pieces, peeled
Feeding Tips:
  • Feed raw, unpeeled to make it more easily digestible
  • Pair with carrots for a tasty, nutritious snack 

Dates

Dates

Dates can provide your dog with dietary fibre, iron, and magnesium. They are also high in sugar and act as a laxative, so they can cause digestive discomfort and complications when fed in excess. Remember to remove the pits before feeding dates to your dog because they are toxic. 

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 1/4 pitted date
  • 30lbs dog - up to 1/2 pitted date cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 70lbs dog - 1 - 2 pitted dates cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Remove pits before feeding
  • Add sliced dates to treats when baking
  • Chop into bite-sized pieces and feed as a treat 

Edamame (or Soybeans)

Edamame

Edamame (or soybeans) are an excellent source of plant protein and fibre. What makes soybeans a little controversial in dog food is that, like other legumes (beans and lentils), they are not a natural part of your dog's diet. In this way, they can be difficult for dogs to digest and should be fed on occasion in small portions. Soybeans also happen to be a common allergen for dogs, but this poses no problem unles you know your dog is allergic. As with other bean varieties, feeding too many can cause your dog to have excess gas or other digestive discomfort.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1-3 individual beans
  • 30lbs dog - 1 - 1½ Tbsp. of raw or cooked beans without seasoning or added salt
  • 70lbs dog - 2-3Tbsp beans
Feeding Tips:
  • Feed cooked or steamed with no extra salt or seasoning like soy sauce
  • Feed just the beans without the pods
  • Raw soybeans can be harder to digest, so stick with cooked
  • Take-out or commercially prepared edamame usually has added salt, so avoid feeding these to your dog 

Green Beans

Green Beans

These vegetables are low in calories but are very filling - a good combination for dogs that are on the heavier side. They are high in iron and magnesium as well as various vitamins, including A, K, and C. Try substituting them for a small portion of your dog’s regular food once in a while to help him maintain an optimal weight and keep him feeling full longer. However, as with other legumes, beans can be hard to digest, so keep them as an occasional treat only.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 - 2 bite-sized pieces
  • 30lbs dog - up to 1 bean, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 70lbs dog - 2-3 beans, cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Feed fresh, steamed, frozen, or canned (low or no sodium only only)
  • Substitute for a small portion of your dog's regular food
  • Pair with other vegetables like carrots or zucchini to add variety

Greens - Cabbage, Spinach, Kale, Varieties of Lettuce, Collards, Beet & Turnip Greens, Radicchio, Wheat Grass

Kale & Spinach

All of these varieties are very nutritious for dogs as they mimic the grassy, leafy component of a dog's ancestral diet. These leafy greens provide a wide variety of health benefits, including essential dietary fibre, antioxidants, various minerals like iron, calcium and potassium, and vitamins A, E, C and K (great for keeping the bones and immune system healthy and strong). Like other fibrous vegetables, though, feeding too much can cause your dog to be gassy or suffer from other GI distress. Certain varieties, like spinach and kale (superfoods), offer additional benefits of reducing inflammation and regulating metabolism.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 2-3Tbsp juiced, steamed, or shredded
  • 30lbs dog - 1/4 - 1/3 cup juiced, steamed, or shredded
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup juiced, steamed, or shredded
Feeding Tips:
  • Feed juiced or lightly steamed
  • Sprinkle shredded pieces directly onto your dog's food
  • Try mixing spinach or kale next time you are baking dog treats

Kiwi

Kiwi

The kiwifruit offers a variety of benefits for dogs, including vitamins C, K, and E, potassium, beta carotene and lots of dietary fibre. It's best not to feed your dog a whole kiwifruit because it can become a choking hazard.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Two
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 2 small slices kiwi
  • 30lbs dog - up to 1/2 large kiwi, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1 large kiwi, cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Remove the peel before feeding
  • Cut into bite-sized pieces and feed fresh or frozen 

Legumes - Beans, Lentils, Peas

 Legumes

Not only are legumes a good source of protein, they also provide essential fibre, vitamins (A, B, K, and C) and minerals (phosphorus, potassium). Many dog food companies have begun to replace high-glycemic carbohydrates (i.e. corn, potatoes, white rice) with low-glycemic legumes to provide more nutritional value, stabilize blood sugar, and to keep dogs feeling full longer. Like soybeans, legumes are not a natural part of a dog's ancestral diet, but they do have a good mix of protein and fibre to provide some benefit to dogs in moderate quantities, particularly dogs who need to lose weight. Legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas do not have the same allergen risk as soy, which makes them more universally beneficial for dogs. Too many legumes may cause your dog to become more gassy or have other digestive distress.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1-3 individual beans
  • 30lbs dog - 1 - 1½ Tbsp. of raw or cooked beans without seasoning or added salt
  • 70lbs dog - 2-3Tbsp beans
Feeding Tips:
  • Most legumes should be fully cooked before feeding for best nutrient absorption
  • Avoid feeding canned varieties or choose an unsalted option
  • Feed small portion of frozen peas for a refreshing, delicious snack
  • Serve small amounts of cooked legumes with cooked brown rice and carrots

Mango

Mango

Many dogs love this sweet, juicy fruit. Not only do mangoes have great flavour, they are also rich in vitamins A, B6, C, and E and a variety of other beneficial nutrients like flavonoids, potassium, and beta-carotene. Mango also contains  enzymes that help soothe the digestive tract and aid in the breakdown of proteins. When feeding mango to your dog, be sure to take slices closer to the outside of the fruit because the pit contains cyanide, which is toxic to dogs.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog -  Up to 2 small bite-sized pieces (up to 2 Tbsp)
  • 30lbs dog - Up to four 1" square pieces (1/8 cup)
  • 70lbs dog - Up to 1/4 cup, cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Great to feed fresh or frozen
  • Remove pit before feeding to your dog
  • Peel the mango and take slices closer to the outside, further from the pit 

Melons - Cantaloupe, Honeydew, Watermelon

Melons

Thinking about sharing some of your melon with your pooch on a hot summer day? Go ahead! Not only is are melons safe, they are a great way to keep your dog hydrated, too. Melons are low in calories, high in fibre, and very nutritious. Just a few of the beneficial nutrients melons provide include niacin, potassium, vitamins A, C, and B-6, and beta-carotene, which is great for eye health. Avoid feeding the rind and seeds, which can be hard for dogs to digest.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 2 Tbsp, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 30lbs dog - up to Four 1" square pieces with rind removed (1/4 cup)
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup, cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Remove rind and seeds before feeding to your dog
  • Mix with a small portion of cottage cheese or plain, natural yogurt

Nectarines & Peaches

Peaches

These sweet summer fruits are high in antioxidants and make a great source of essential vitamins (A, E, and the B-complex) and minerals (iron, zinc, copper, phosphorous, and potassium). Nectarines and peaches are also low in calories but high in fibre, which can improve your dog's digestion when fed in moderation. Remove the pit, which contains cyanide, before feeding to your dog.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  •  10lbs dog - up to 1/4 peach or nectarine, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  30lbs dog - up to 1/2 small peach or nectarine, cleaned well, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  70lbs dog - up to 1 small peach or nectarine, cleaned well, cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Remove pit before feeding to your dog

Papaya

Papaya

This tropical fruit can work as a digestive aid for young and old dogs with sensitive stomachs. Its high fibre content and digestive enzymes help reduce bloating, flatulence, diarrhea, and constipation. Papaya is rich in vitamins K, E, A, and C, which will boost your dog's immune system and energy levels. Papaya is also a good source of folate, potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 2 Tbsp, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 30lbs dog - up to Four 1" square pieces with peel removed (1/4 cup)
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup, cut into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Remove the peel and seeds before feeding to your dog
  • Mash or puree a small portion and mix into your dog's regular food to ease digestive problems 

Pears

Pears

The crunchy texture of pears is reason enough for your dog to love them. This fruit is packed with vitamins and minerals that are beneficial to dogs of all breeds and life stages, and it's also high in digestion-boosting fibre. Be sure to remove the pear core and seeds before feeding because they can be harmful to dogs.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size:
  •  10lbs dog - 1 - 2 slices, cut into bite-sizes pieces (1/4 cup)
  •  30lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup, cut into bite-sized pieces
  •  70lbs dog - up to 1 small pear, cut into bite-sized pieces (up to 3/4 cup)
Feeding Tips:
  • Remove core and seeds before feeding
  • Top with a dollop of plain, natural yogurt

Pineapple

Pineapple

Pineapple can provide some unique benefits to your dog. It is rich in bromelain, which helps with digestion and the breakdown of protein. Pineapple is also full of vitamins and minerals that will help boost your dog's immune system function.  Another unique benefit pineapple has for dogs is preventing coprophagia (dogs eating stool) because of the undesirable taste it gives off once digested. Some dogs may suffer from runny stools if they eat too much pineapple, but that is a common side effect from eating too much of any fruit.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 2 Tbsp, cut into bite-sized pieces, 1 tsp natural, unsweetened pineapple juice
  • 30lbs dog - up to Four 1" square pieces with rind removed (1/4 cup) 1 - 2 tsp. natural, unsweetened pineapple juice
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup, cut into bite-sized pieces, 1-1.5 Tbsp natural, unsweetened pineapple juice
Feeding Tips:
  • Feed to your dog fresh or frozen
  • Remove core and all rind before serving to your dog
  • Cut into bite-sized pieces
  • Add a very small portion of natural, unsweetened pineapple juice to your dog's regular food if he is prone to eating his own stool (coprophagia). Treat other dogs in the house, as well. 

Plums/Prunes

Plums

Plums and prunes have laxative properties, which can aid dog's digestion in moderation. They are a good source of Vitamin C, antioxidants, and iron, but feeding too many may cause your dog to have loose stools and bowel discomfort. Remove the pits before feeding because the cyanide they contain is toxic to dogs.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Two
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 1/2 small plum or prune, pitted and sliced into bite-sized pieces
  • 30lbs dog - 1 - 2 small plums or prunes, pitted and sliced into bite-sized pieces
  • 70lbs dog - up to 2 small plums or prunes, pitted and sliced into bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Remove pits before feeding to your dog
  • Keep an eye on your dog after feeding plums or prunes to watch for digestive discomfort

Potatoes

Potatoes

Potatoes, like corn, are okay to feed your dog on occasion, but they offer little nutritional value. Whole potatoes provide a source of fibre, vitamins B3, B6, and C, minerals, antioxidants, and potassium, iron, and copper. Keep the skins on, too, since they contain significant quantities of molybdenum, chromium and selenium.

Your dog would be better off skipping the French fries and fried wedges because they contain excess oil and salt that can be harmful. In addition, any green parts on a potato (unripe areas, leaves, or stems) are toxic to your dog (and you).

Feeding Frequency Scale: Two
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup bite-sized cooked pieces
  • 30lbs dog - up to 1/3 cup bite-sized cooked pieces
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup bite-sized cooked pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Serve baked or boiled, cut into bite-sized pieces or mashed
  • Do not add any salt, butter, or other toppings when feeding to your dog
  • To be safe, thoroughly wash potatoes before cooking and serving to your dog
  • Do not feed your dog any potatoes that have any green on them

Pumpkin

Pumpkin

Pumpkin is a well-known superfood that offers a wide variety of health benefits for both dogs and humans. It is an excellent source of soluble fibre and can be used to soothe a dog's upset stomach and naturally firm up stools for dogs with diarrhea (like bananas). It is low in calories and rich in Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and potassium. Pumpkin, like pineapple, is also a natural cure for coprophagia (dogs eating poop). Since pumpkin has a high fibre content, start with half the recommended dosage first to see how your dog responds.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 - 2 tsp bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
  • 30lbs dog - 2 - 3 Tbsp bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/3 cup bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
Feeding Tips:
  • Unsweetened, raw or canned (avoid pie filling)
  • Serve in bite-sized pieces, fully cooked or steamed
  • Add a couple of spoonfuls to your dog's bowl when transitioning to a new food 

Radishes

Radishes

The entire fibrous radish plant is safe for dogs. Radishes and their greens are rich in Vitamin C, potassium, and even protein. However, some dogs may be averse to the spicy flavour, so don't try to force your dog to eat it. Watch your dog closely after feeding for the first couple of times for any signs of indigestion.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Two
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 - 2 tsp seeds, sprouts, or greens, 1/2 small radish, cut into thin slices
  • 30lbs dog - 1 - 2 Tbsp seeds, sprouts, or greens, 1 small radish, cut into thin slices
  • 70lbs dog -  up to 1/4 cup seeds, sprouts, or greens, 2 small radishes, cut into thin slices
Feeding Tips:
  • Sprinkle seeds, shredded sprouts or greens on your dog's food
  • Cut raw or cooked radish into thin slices to feed as a healthy treat

Raspberries

Raspberries

Raspberries make a delicious treat for dogs, whether they're fresh from your garden or frozen. Like other berries, they are rich in antioxidants and vitamins C, K, and B-complex. Raspberries also contain magnesium, manganese, potassium, copper and iron. They are high in natural sugars, though, so be sure not to feed your dog too many.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1-2 large berries
  • 30lbs dog - 3-4 large berries
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/4 cup large berries (about 6 berries)
Feeding Tips:
  • Serve to your dog fresh or frozen
  • Mix with a small portion of cottage cheese or freeze with plain, natural yogurt for a special treat

Squash (Winter)

Squash

Various varieties of winter squash can add beta carotene, iron, Vitamin C, and dietary fibre to your dog's diet. Many types of squash also carry anti-inflammatory properties and work to improve eye and digestive health, along with many other benefits. It is also higher in fat than many vegetables, which can keep your dog full for longer. 

Feeding Frequency Scale: Three
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 - 2 tsp bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
  • 30lbs dog - 2 - 3 Tbsp bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/3 cup bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
Feeding Tips:
  • Serve steamed squash in small, bite-sized portions with peel removed
  • Mix pieces directly into your dog's regular food

Strawberries

Strawberries

Strawberries are a sweet, refreshing treat for dogs, whether fresh from the garden or frozen. Like other berries, they are rich in antioxidants and vitamins C, K, and B-complex. Strawberries also provide fibre, iodine, magnesium, folic acid, and potassium. They are high in natural sugars, so feed sparingly.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 medium berry or 1/2 of a large berry
  • 30lbs dog - 2-3 medium berries
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/2 cup berries
Feeding Tips:
  • Serve to your dog fresh or frozen
  • Mix with a small portion of cottage cheese or freeze with plain, natural yogurt for a special treat

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are another superfood that mosts dogs can't resist. These tasty vegetables are packed with B vitamins, Vitamin A and C, as well as manganese, copper, and iron. In addition, they have an extremely high antioxidant content and are a great source of dietary fibre, which is great for an upset stomach or when you're transitioning your dog to a new food.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Five
Adequate Portion Size:
  • 10lbs dog - 1 - 2 tsp bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
  • 30lbs dog - 2 - 3 Tbsp bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
  • 70lbs dog - up to 1/3 cup bite-sized cooked pieces or puree
Feeding Tips:
  • Mash small portions of cooked sweet potato into dog's food too improve digestion
  • Feed small baked or dehydrated (unseasoned) slices as an occasional treat
  • Add small pieces to bowl when transitioning your dog to a new food 

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are high in antioxidants and a variety of vitamins, especially Vitamin C. A few things must be kept in mind when feeding tomatoes to your dog - unripe tomatoes, stems, and leaves are all toxic to dogs. Make sure that the tomatoes you feed are completely ripe and peeled to avoid putting your dog at risk.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Two
Adequate Portion Size: 1 - 2 Tbsp. diced tomatoes or 2 - 3 1/2" square pieces of raw or cooked tomato, fully ripened
Feeding Tips:
  • Pick out only completely ripe tomatoes for your dog
  • Remove the peel and all stems or leaves before feeding
  • Peel and/or fully cook and serve in bite-sized pieces

Zucchini

Zucchini

Good news - the entire zucchini plant (seeds included) is safe and nutritious for your dog to eat. It is rich in calcium, potassium, beta-carotene, folate, and vitamins C, A, and K. It can be fed straight from your garden as long as it's clear of pesticides and other harmful chemicals.

Feeding Frequency Scale: Four
Adequate Portion Size: 1 - 2 bite-sized pieces
Feeding Tips:
  • Raw and frozen forms contain the highest amount of beneficial nutrients
  • It can also be served steamed of cooked
  • Grate a small portion directly onto your dog's regular food
  • Toss him an occasional piece as